ANIME THAT JAZZ – ZANKOKU NA TENSHI NO THESIS (EVANGELION)

It also contains vocal tracks by her voice actress, Megumi Hayashibara , for the “Rei Ayanami versions” of certain songs related to Neon Genesis Evangelion. It peaked well at number 8 in the Oricon album charts, charting for a total of 16 weeks. It was used as the opening to the series, and two instrumental versions of it were played in the finale episode titled ” Take care of yourself. Refrain the Songs Were Inspired by Evangelion is an album consisting of songs from and based on the Neon Genesis Evangelion anime series. Godzilla and Terror of Mechagodzilla.

All songs are performed by Yoko Takahashi who performed the opening theme for the series as well as other tracks , track 14 being an exception which was recorded on the streets of London by street singers. It reached a peak of rank 1 in the Oricon album database. Rei Ayanami’s fictional birth date however, is unclear. Retrieved June 17, Archived from the original on February 21, The song became known popularly as “Fly Me to the Moon” from its first line, and after a few years the publishers changed the title to that officially.

Godzilla and Terror of Mechagodzilla. Released on December 4,it peaked at number 38 in the Oricon album chart, making 2 appearances in total. Retrieved February 14, It peak ranked 2nd in Oricon singles charts and remained there for 26 weeks. Refrain of Evangelion is a soundtrack album featuring music from the anime television series Neon Genesis Evangelion and the films Evangelion: This page was last edited on 14 Mayat Humorous moments of the drama include Rei finally lashing out against Asuka’s abuse, the Evangelion pilots being changed to resemble Super Sentai characters, Asuka and Kaworu interacting for the only time in the series, and the cast re-enacting the first episode solely by their own vocal sound effects.

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The vocal is smooth, but aggressive when necessary, especially in the chorus. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. For the anime series, Yoko Takahashi performed the song ” A Cruel Angel’s Thesis ” which was used as the opening theme song for the series.

Zankoku na Tenshi no Thesis 8-bit mix. The first press version of the soundtrack included a white slipcover and an Evangelion: Recording Industry Association of Japan. Retrieved June 11, The fourth movement was used in the 24th episode of the series, and was previously released on Neon Genesis Evangelion Addition.

anime that jazz - zankoku na tenshi no thesis (evangelion)

Neon Genesis Evangelion songs Video game soundtracks Anime soundtracks. Archived from the original on February 21, The album features background music and instrumental tracks related to Rei’s appearances in the Neon Genesis Evangelion TV series and movies.

『残酷な天使のテーゼ』 Zankoku na tenshi no te-ze…

Hideaki Anno wrote both the original Japanese lyrics for this song and the tensho “Everything You’ve Ever Dreamed”, which was also sung by Arianne and composed by Shiro Sagisu it later appeared on the Refrain of Evangelion album.

It features three instrumental, five vocal, and four drama tracks. Walked the whole way home (fvangelion) the bar whistling Zankoku na Tenshi no Thesis. Most of the songs are new versions of background music from the original Evangelion animated television series.

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Hayashibara, Miyamura, and Mitsuishi are accompanied by the voice actor for Shinji Ikari and the supporting characters on the drama track “Shuukyoku no Tsudzuki” “After the End”a comedic parody in which the reunited cast tries to come up with ways to continue Evangelion when popular demand makes the studio order them to produce a third season even though the TV series ended after a episode run.

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Refrain the Songs Were Inspired by Evangelion. Isn’t this song good?

anime that jazz - zankoku na tenshi no thesis (evangelion)

Retrieved May 6, Rei Ayanami’s fictional birth date however, is unclear. In addition ja tracks included on earlier Evangelion soundtracks, this 7-disc set includes many unused songs and alternate mixes or arrangements of existing songs.

The album reached a peak of rank 1 on the Oricon album database, with 11 frequent appearances. The song became known popularly as “Fly Me to the Moon” from its first line, and after a few years the publishers changed the title to that officially.

It peaked well at number 8 in the Oricon album charts, charting for a total of 16 weeks. Tracks are of Tnat No. Air Orchestral Suite No. The CD is no longer in print. Shiro Sagisu continues to strive forward in delivering an impressive and satisfying contribution to the realm of Evangelion.